Made In The U.S.A.

Posts Tagged ‘Fence’

What about bamboo?

In Adventures on April 25, 2009 at 12:54 am

It may not be American-grown, but it certainly is renewable–as anyone who’s ever made the mistake of planting bamboo in the back yard of a previous residence knows all too well. (Actually, it might be American-grown too. I just haven’t verified it yet.)

Bamboo is a super-plant. Because it’s so abundant, fast growing and durable, it’s a popular choice for “greener” flooring and other applications where Read the rest of this entry »

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Got wood? No, actually. In fact I do not.

In Adventures on April 24, 2009 at 12:40 am

The worst thing about my recent realization that it’s impractical for a regular guy to buy wood that doesn’t represent the utter destruction of the planet, is that there’s no better building material for fences and decks and framing and all sorts of other practical uses than good, old fashioned, wood.

Sure, you can surface your deck with composite material that looks like plastic, or high-quality composite material that doesn’t look like plastic but costs Read the rest of this entry »

Lowe’s is to Home Depot what Target is to Wal Mart.

In Adventures on April 3, 2009 at 12:52 am

I tore out the chain link fence that’s on the other side of the crappy wooden fence that separates my yard from the yard of the empty house immediately to the east of me. It was actually quite enjoyable. And it means that I’m officially underway with the fence replacement project. I still have to tear out the wooden fence before it can be replaced, and I need to figure out what materials to use when I do that. But I started, so that’s good. Read the rest of this entry »

How much wood would a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck was an ecologically friendly purchaser of timber products?

In Adventures on March 30, 2009 at 12:59 am

I have spared you the painful details about lumber long enough. Here’s the thing, you have two issues (if you’re me) regarding buying lumber. One, is it MITUSA. Two, is it the conscientious choice.

I inquired at Home Depot’s service desk about the origin of its lumber. The guy called another guy and they chatted and hemmed and hawed and, Read the rest of this entry »